Friday, 9 September 2016

Original History II

See the previous post and comments.

In the two temporal dimensions scenario, the original history is "snuffed out" from the point of view of a hypothetical observer for whom the first temporal dimension is a fourth spatial dimension but not from the point of view of any inhabitant of the original history. The fact that a particular individual did live in part of the original history is not negated or "snuffed out" either by the fact that that history also contains periods subsequent to his death or by the fact that the entire history has, from the point of view of the hypothetical observer, receded into the past of a second temporal dimension.

If it is said that the original history still exists from the point of view of the inhabitants of the subsequent history, this implies that (i) the two histories coexist in a fourth spatial dimension rather than that (ii) the subsequent history has succeeded the original history along a second temporal dimension. Travel between histories is more likely in (i) than (ii). Time Patrollers can travel back and forth within the current timeline but not to earlier or later timelines - although I speculate about one way to reach earlier timelines.

If a large temporal vehicle with many passengers entered the "deleted" Carthaginian timeline, then that vehicle still exists until its departure point in the current timeline. If someone now time travels to before that departure point and stows away in the vehicle, does he enter the "deleted" timeline with it or does his presence in the vehicle alter its quantum status so that it now moves futureward along the current timeline?

7 comments:

  1. Kaor, Paul!

    Very skull splitting, trying to make sense of time traveling!

    One thing I remember reading in the Nantucket books was how some of the characters worried that their being sent back more than 3000 years into the past DID annul, snuff out, delete, wipe out, etc., the "original timeline." That EVERYTHING forward OF the moment they arrived in the past was deleted. Altho I don't think any mention is made of them in the Nantucket books, it would be APPROPRIATE if some of the characters had read Anderson's time traveling and alternate universe stories.

    Hmmm, my tendency to drop the "ugh" in words like "although" makes me wonder if that will someday become standard, that it will someday be spelled "altho." And thus English might evolved into Anglic!

    Sean

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sean,
      The name "Anglic" might be adopted in honor of Poul Anderson. Other sf terms have got into common use.
      Paul.

      Delete
    2. Kaor, Paul!

      And Poul Anderson would deserve such an honor, having a changed and different "English" being called "Anglic."

      SF terns now in common use? I can think of at least two from Heinlein's books: "grok" and "waldo." And I think Anderson contributed "xenosophont" and "sophotect." And others will come to mind with some thought! Or should that be "thot"? (Smiles)

      Sean

      Delete
    3. Sean,
      "Thort."
      James Blish coined the term "gas giant" for Jupiter-type planets.
      Paul.

      Delete
    4. Kaor, Paul!

      Hmmm, "thought" is pronounced as "thort" in the UK? In the New England states of the US the word is said more like "thot," however.

      Yes, I have seen mention of how Blish used "gas giant" for Jovoid planets. It has even been accepted into the scientific literature!

      Sean

      Delete
  2. Paul and Sean:
    Where I live, it's "thawt." Dialects and regional accents divide us all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, David!

      "Thawt" does not seem all that different from "thot." And your comment reminded me of Winston Churchill mordantly saying the US and Britain were divided by a common language!

      Sean

      Delete